MIA (Minneapolis Institute of Art) three ways

Berthe Morisot, The Artist's Daughter, Julie, with her Nanny, c. 1884, oil on canvas, 57.15 x 71.12 cm (MIA)
Berthe Morisot, The Artist's Daughter, Julie, with her Nanny, c. 1884, oil on canvas, 57.15 x 71.12 cm (MIA)

Berthe Morisot, The Artist’s Daughter, Julie, with her Nanny, c. 1884, oil on canvas, 57.15 x 71.12 cm (MIA)

Anna Pottery (manufacturer), Snake Jug, c. 1865, 31.75 x 21.11 x 22.07 (MIA)

Anna Pottery (manufacturer), Snake Jug, c. 1865, 31.75 x 21.11 x 22.07 (MIA)

In person

We have wanted to visit the Minneapolis Museum of Art for a long time and we finally had the chance last Friday (we were on our way to visit Father Columba Stewart who is doing amazing work at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library digitally preserving endangered manuscripts — but we’ll save that for another blog post). Though we only had an hour or two, it was great to see paintings that have long been favorites like Egon Schiele’s Portrait of Paris von Gutersloh (1918) and Millais’s Peace Concluded (1856). There were also wonderful surprises like this Snake Jug (c. 1865) depicting a scene from the Civil War with “Union soldiers attempting to catch Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, who flees them disguised as a woman. The dark spots on the snakes’ heads identify them as copperheads—a moniker for Northerners sympathetic to the Confederate cause.” We had never seen anything like it! We were also struck by the gorgeous painting by Morisot, The Artist’s Daughter, Julie, and her Nanny (1884). We are very much looking forward to returning.

Online

We sent a tweet while strolling through the galleries about the Snake Jug, and were directed to MIA’s Artstories feature to learn more. Our favorite feature is an interactive that guides viewers through details of a work of art—this works especially well for complex images like Albrecht Dürer’s Triumphal Arch of Maximilian I.

Albrecht Dürer, The Triumphal Arch of Maximilian I, woodcuts, etchings, letterpress, 67.95 x 49.85 x 2.54 cm (MIA)

Albrecht Dürer, The Triumphal Arch of Maximilian I, woodcuts, etchings, letterpress, 67.95 x 49.85 x 2.54 cm (MIA)

MIA’s website is beautiful and easy to use – with a clear “download” button (which we especially appreciate). We have just one request MIA—could you offer higher resolution images for downloading?

Video

We also discovered a great new video series that MIA has produced “Art is….” We enjoyed the entire series (and hope that there are more coming), and we especially liked “Art is Learning. Andrea”

Thanks MIA!

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: